Go to the content. | Move to the navigation | Go to the site search | Go to the menu | Contacts | Accessibility

| Create Account

Peruzzo, Denis (2009) Quantification of Cerebral Hemodynamic from Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technique. [Ph.D. thesis]

Full text disponibile come:

[img]
Preview
Documento PDF
3415Kb

Abstract (english)

Abstract

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique used in radiology to visualize the anatomical structures and the functions of the body. Thanks to its fine spatial resolution and to the great contrast between the different soft tissues, MRI has become the most used method for the anatomical image generation. During the last two decades, MRI was widely studied and developed, so high performance devices and new analysis protocols are now available. As an outcome, MR can now be used also to perform functional analysis. Currently, the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is the gold standard technique in functional imaging. However, MRI is becoming a valid alternative to PET in functional analysis because of its greater spatial resolution, its wide diffusion and the absence of ionizing radiations.

Currently, perfusion magnetic resonance using an exogenous tracer, such as gadolinium, is the most interesting technique for the quantitative study of the hemodynamic. The Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DSC-MRI) allows to quantify important hemodynamic parameters that play an important role in the study of several pathologies, such as cerebral neoplasia, ischemia or infarction, epilepsy, dementia and schizophrenia. The commonly used model for describing the DSC-MRI signal is based on the non diffusible tracer theory, also called dilution theory. It assumes that the tracer remains intravascular, the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) is intact and there is no tracer recirculation. Under these assumptions, the model allows to estimate the Cerebral Blood Volume (CBV), the Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) and the Mean Transit Time (MTT).

The most crucial step in the DSC-MRI image quantification is the residue function estimate that presents some limitations. The most important ones, that are considered in this work, are:

• the necessity to know the Arterial Input Function (AIF), which is the concentration time curve in the vessels feeding the tissue;
• the assessment of the residue function requiring to perform a deconvolution operation, which is a well-known difficult mathematical problem.

Currently, AIF is measured directly on the MR images, by selecting a small number of pixels containing one of the principal arterial vessels. The pixel selection can be made either manually, by a physician, or by means of automatic algorithms. During the past years, several automatic and semiautomatic methods for the AIF extraction have been proposed, but a standard has not been achieved, yet. In this work, the AIF selection and deconvolution problems are discussed in depth. A new selection method, combining anatomical information with MR-signal analysis in presented. It is compared to the other AIF selection algorithms proposed in literature on a simulated data set. Then, a comparison with the manual selection method on a clinical data set is performed and the AIF selection impact on CBF, CBV and MTT estimate is investigated. The proposed method has been shown to reliably reconstruct the true AIF, providing accurate estimates and very narrow confidence bands. Moreover, it is robust against the different noise levels, thus increasing the reproducibility level in DSC-MRI image quantification. Furthermore, AIFs obtained with the new method have been shown to lead to a more accurate diagnosis than the manual ones.

Another critical step in DSC-MRI data analysis is the deconvolution operation, that allows to estimate the residue function. Problems in this step are due to the deconvolution intrinsic problems (e.g. the ill-posedness and the ill-conditioning) and to the physiological system specific problems (e.g. non negative constrains). Moreover, another important source of error in the residue function estimate is the possible presence of delay and/or dispersion in AIF. Currently, the most used deconvolution methods are the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and the block-Circulant Singular Value Decomposition (cSVD). SVD is historically the first and the most important deconvolution method proposed in the DSC-MRI context and it is currently the reference method. The cSVD method is the natural evolution of SVD and it has been proposed to overcome the problem of delay in the AIF. Several other deconvolution methods have been proposed in literature. Among them all, we focus on a recently proposed method, the Nonlinear Stochastic Regularization (NSR), that accounts for both the smoothness and the non-negativity constraint of the residue function.

In this work, a new deconvolution method is presented. The Population Deconvolution (PD) method exploits a population approach to analyse a large set of similar voxels at the same time, thus improving the data quality in the deconvolution operation. PD has been validated on simulated data and compared to SVD and cSVD. PD can reconstruct reliable and physiological residue functions. The residue functions obtained using PD present very small and damped oscillations compared to SVD and cSVD ones. Furthermore, PD has been shown to accurately estimate the CBF both in presence and in absence of dispersion, providing better results than SVD and cSVD. SVD, cSVD and PD have been compared also to NSR on clinical data. CBF and MTT maps provided by PD present a greater contrast level than SVD and cSVD ones, as they emphasize the flow and transit time differences. Also NSR maps are extremely contrasted, but they appear noisier than the PD ones. A new physiological indicator, the Laterality Index, has also been introduced. It provides a graphical representation of the CBF and MTT map information, integrating all the information provided by the different parameters. NSR provides very large laterality indices, thus emphasizing the disease affected regions. Nevertheless, the detection of the pathological areas is not easy because of the large LI variability also in the healthy regions. On the contrary, SVD and cSVD laterality indices make the disease detection difficult because they do not emphasize the pathological areas. PD meets the need to underline the pathologic areas without showing false positive results, providing larger LIs than the SVD and cSVD ones, but smaller than the NSR ones. Therefore, PD has been shown to lead to a more accurate diagnosis than the other methods.

Finally, another promising deconvolution method, called DNP, is presented. Differently from PD, that has to be applied to large data sets because of its population approach, DNP is a voxel based method, thus it can be applied also to a small number of voxels. The most interesting DNP feature is that it accounts for both the residue function continuity and the system BIBO-stability. Moreover, it can estimate the AIF delay, thus improving the accuracy in the R(t) estimation. Since it is still under development, only the DNP preliminary results are presented in this work. DNP has been shown to provide more accurate CBF estimates than SVD and cSVD, both in presence and absence of delay and dispersion. Furthermore, the DNP reconstructed residue functions show neither the negative values nor the spurious oscillations usually present in the SVD and cSVD ones. However, DNP bears some limitations too. Currently, the most important DNP limitation is the delay estimation. DNP usually overestimates the delay, above all in presence of dispersion, thus providing a non accurate characterization of the residue function. Another DNP problem is that the hyper-parameter quantification requires a non-linear step, which increases the computation time of the algorithm.

In conclusion, although they present some limitations in the post-processing analysis, DSC-MRI techniques are becoming an important tool in medical research and in clinical practice. The development of a fully automatic algorithm for the AIF selection and of a deconvolution method based on a population approach would improve the clinical and scientific information provided by DSC-MRI analysis.

Abstract (italian)

Abstract

La Risonanza Magnetica (RM) è una tecnica di imaging medico che viene utilizzata in radiologia sia per le strutture anatomiche sia per le funzionalità del corpo umano. Grazie all’elevata risoluzione spaziale di cui dispone e al notevole livello di contrasto tra le differenti tipologie di tessuto, la RM è diventata lo strumento per la generazione di immagini anatomiche più diffuso. Negli ultimi decenni, la RM è stata oggetto di studi approfonditi e notevoli sviluppi, tanto che oggi sono disponibili macchinari ad elevate prestazioni e un ampio numero di protocolli d’acquisizione differenti. Di conseguenza, la RM ha cominciato a essere utilizzata anche per studi funzionali. Attualmente, la Tomografia ad Emissione di Positroni (PET) è la tecnica di riferimento per gli studi funzionali, ma la RM sta diventando una valida alternativa grazie alla sua maggiore risoluzione spaziale, alla sua maggiore diffusione e al fatto che non utilizza radiazioni ionizzanti nocive.

Attualmente, la risonanza magnetica di perfusione che ricorre all’uso di un agente di contrasto esogeno, come il gadolinio, è la tecnica più interessante per lo studio quantitativo dell’emodinamica. La Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DSC-MRI) permette di ricavare importanti parametri emodinamici che ricoprono un ruolo chiave nello studio di svariate patologie, quali la neoplasia cerebrale, l’ischemia, l’infarto, l’epilessia, la demenza e la schizofrenia.

Per caratterizzare il segnale ottenuto con la DSC-MRI viene generalmente utilizzato un modello basato sulla teoria dei traccianti non diffusibili (la teoria della diluizione). Basandosi sulle ipotesi che il tracciante sia intravascolare, che la barriera emato-encefalica sia intatta e che non ci sia ricircolo di tracciante, il modello permette di ricavare il Volume Ematico Cerebrale (CBV), il Flusso Ematico Cerebrale (CBF) e il Tempo Medio di Transito (MTT).

I passaggio chiave per la stima di tali parametri è la quantificazione della funzione residuo, che presenta tuttavia alcuni problemi. In questa tesi saranno trattati i più importanti tra essi:

• la necessità di ricavare la Funzione d’Ingresso Arteriale (AIF), che rappresenta l’andamento nel tempo della concentrazione di tracciante nei vasi che irrorano il tessuto;
• la necessità di ricorrere ad un’operazione di deconvoluzione per ricavare la funzione residuo.

La AIF è solitamente ricavata selezionando alcuni pixel che rappresentano i vasi arteriali principali direttamente sulle immagini di RM. La selezione dei pixel può essere fatta sia manualmente da un radiologo sia tramite un algoritmo di selezione automatica. Recentemente sono stati proposti numerosi algoritmi per svolgere tale compito, ma non si è ancora raggiunto uno standard. In questo lavoro il problema relativo all’estrazione della AIF viene discusso approfonditamente. Si propone un nuovo metodo per la selezione dei pixel arteriali che combina le informazioni anatomiche con l’analisi del segnale DSC-MRI. L’algoritmo è testato su dati simulati e confrontato con i più interessanti algoritmi proposti in letteratura. Successivamente viene applicato anche su dati reali e confrontato con la AIF ottenuta tramite selezione manuale al fine di valutare l’impatto che la scelta della AIF ha sulla stima dei parametri CBF, CBV e MTT. Il metodo proposto ha dimostrato di essere in grado di ricostruire la AIF originale, fornendo sia stime accurate che intervalli di confidenza molto stretti. Inoltre ha dimostrato di essere robusto nei confronti di diversi livelli di rumorosità nei dati, contribuendo quindi all’aumento della riproducibilità nello studio dell’emodinamica cerebrale. Infine, le AIF ottenute tramite il nuovo algoritmo hanno permesso di effettuare diagnosi più accurate rispetto a quelle ottenute tramite selezione manuale.

Un altro passaggio critico per l’analisi dei dati DSC-MRI è rappresentato dall’operazione di deconvoluzione necessaria per la stima della funzione residuo. I problemi in quest’ambito sono legati sia ai problemi intrinseci della deconvoluzione (ad esempio il fatto che è un problema matematico mal condizionato e mal posto), sia ad aspetti dovuti al fatto che si tratta di un sistema fisiologico (ad esempio vincoli di non negatività). Inoltre, la possibile presenza di dispersione e ritardo nella AIF costituisce un’altra importante fonte di errore per la stima della funzione residuo. Ad oggi, i metodi di deconvoluzione più diffusi sono la Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) e la block-Circulant Singular Value Decomposition (cSVD). La SVD è storicamente il primo metodo proposto per lo studio dei dati DSC-MRI e rappresenta ancora il metodo di riferimento in quest’ambito. La cSVD è invece la naturale evoluzione della SVD, proposta per eliminare i problemi dovuti al ritardo nella AIF che caratterizzano la SVD. Numerosi metodi sono stati proposti negli anni in letteratura. Tra i vari, citiamo la Nonlinear Stochastic Regularization (NSR), che permette di tener conto sia dei vincoli di non negatività sia della regolarità della funzione residuo.

In questo lavoro si presenta un nuovo metodo di deconvoluzione. La Population Deconvolution (PD) che analizza contemporaneamente un ampio numero di voxel simili sfruttando un approccio di popolazione, quindi migliorando la qualità dei dati utilizzati per l’operazione di deconvoluzione. Il metodo PD è stato validato su dati simulati e confrontato sia con la SVD che con la cSVD. PD riesce a ricostruire funzioni residuo che risultato credibili e fisiologiche in quanto presentano oscillazioni poco ampie e più smorzate rispetto a quelle presenti nelle funzioni residuo ottenuto con la SVD e la cSVD. PD permette inoltre di ricavare stime accurate di CBF, sia in presenza che in assenza di dispersione nella AIF, fornendo risultati migliori rispetto alla SVD e alla cSVD. PD, SVD e cSVD sono stati inoltre utilizzati per l’analisi di dati reali e sono stati confrontati anche con NSR. Le mappe di CBF e MTT ottenute tramite PD presentano un livello di contrasto migliore rispetto a quelle ottenute con SVD e cSVD, enfatizzando maggiormente le aree caratterizzate da un diverso flusso ematico. Anche le mappe ottenute tramite NSR presentano un alto livello di contrasto, risultando però più rumorose rispetto a quelle ottenute tramite PD. Si è inoltre introdotto un nuovo indicatore fisiologico, l’indice di lateralità, che permette di fornire una rappresentazione grafica e di integrare le informazioni contenute nelle mappe di CBF e MTT. NSR fornisce valori di lateralità molto ampi, evidenziando notevolmente le zone caratterizzate da diversi flussi ematici. Tuttavia, l’individuazione delle aree colpite dalla patologia è resa difficoltosa dal fatto che anche le aree sane sono caratterizzate da ampi indici di lateralità. L’opposto si verifica considerando gli indici di lateralità ottenuti tramite SVD o cSVD; in questo caso l’individuazione delle aree malate è resa difficile dal fatto che gli indici forniti sono molto piccoli. PD invece permette di ottenere degli indici di lateralità che evidenziano le aree malate più di quanto non facciano SVD o cSVD, ma con valori meno ampi rispetto a NSR, soprattutto nelle regioni sane. In questo modo, PD permette di ottenere diagnosi più accurate.

Infine, in questo lavoro viene presentato un ulteriore promettente metodo di deconvoluzione, chiamato DNP. A differenza di PD, che deve essere utilizzato per l’analisi di un elevato numero di voxel a causa dell’approccio di popolazione, DNP è un metodo di deconvoluzione di singoli voxel, quindi può essere applicato anche all’analisi di regioni contenenti pochi voxel. L’aspetto più interessante del metodo DNP è che permette di tenere conto sia del fatto che la funzione residuo deve essere continua, sia del fatto che un sistema fisiologico è, naturalmente, BIBO stabile. Inoltre, tale metodo permette di stimare anche il ritardo normalmente presente nella AIF, migliorando la precisione nella stima della funzione residuo. Dato che il metodo è ancora in fase di sviluppo, nella tesi sono riportati solo dei risultati preliminari. Tali risultati mostrano che DNP è in grado di fornire stime di CBF più accurate rispetto a SVD e cSVD, sia in presenza che in assenza di dispersione e ritardo. Inoltre, le funzioni residuo ottenute tramite DNP non presentano valori negativi e le oscillazioni non fisiologiche generalmente presenti nei risultati forniti da SVD e cSVD. D’altro canto, DNP presenta ancora dei problemi, il più importante dei quali è il calcolo del ritardo nella AIF, poco preciso e generalmente sovrastimato, soprattutto in presenza di dispersione. Inoltre, DNP non riesce ancora a caratterizzare bene l’andamento della funzione residuo. Un altro problema non ancora risolto è legato alla stima degli iper-parametri. Infatti questo aspetto richiede alcuni passaggi non lineari che incrementano notevolmente i tempi di calcolo necessari all’algoritmo.

In conclusione, anche se presenta ancora numerosi limiti nella fase di analisi del segnale, la DSC-MRI sta diventando uno strumento molto importante sia nella pratica clinica che nella fase di ricerca medica. Gli algoritmi di selezione della AIF e di deconvoluzione che sono stati proposti in questa tesi permettono di migliorare l’informazione clinica e scientifica che si può ottenere dall’analisi dei dati ottenuti tramite DSC-MRI.

Statistiche Download - Aggiungi a RefWorks
EPrint type:Ph.D. thesis
Tutor:Cobelli, Claudio
Supervisor:Bertoldo, Alessandra
Ph.D. course:Ciclo 21 > Scuole per il 21simo ciclo > INGEGNERIA DELL'INFORMAZIONE > BIOINGEGNERIA
Data di deposito della tesi:29 January 2009
Anno di Pubblicazione:28 January 2009
Key Words:DSC-MRI Deconvolution AIF selection Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging Arterial Input Function CBF CBV MTT
Settori scientifico-disciplinari MIUR:Area 09 - Ingegneria industriale e dell'informazione > ING-INF/06 Bioingegneria elettronica e informatica
Struttura di riferimento:Dipartimenti > Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione
Codice ID:1631
Depositato il:29 Jan 2009
Simple Metadata
Full Metadata
EndNote Format

Bibliografia

I riferimenti della bibliografia possono essere cercati con Cerca la citazione di AIRE, copiando il titolo dell'articolo (o del libro) e la rivista (se presente) nei campi appositi di "Cerca la Citazione di AIRE".
Le url contenute in alcuni riferimenti sono raggiungibili cliccando sul link alla fine della citazione (Vai!) e tramite Google (Ricerca con Google). Il risultato dipende dalla formattazione della citazione.

[1] Alsop D.C., Detre J.A. Reduced Transit-time Sensitivity in Noninvasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Human Cerebral Blood Flow. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 16: 1236-1249 (1996). Cerca con Google

[2] Alsop D.C., Wedmid A., Schlaug G. Defining a Local Input Function for Perfusion Quantification with Bolus Contrast MRI. Proceedings of 10th Annual Meeting ISMRM, pag. 659, Honolulu, Haway, USA (2002). Cerca con Google

[3] Andersen I.K., Szymkowiak A., Rasmussen C.E., Hanson L.G., Marstrand J.R., Larsson H.B.W., Hansen L.K. Perfusion Quantification Using Gaussian Process Deconvolution. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 48: 351-361 (2002). Cerca con Google

[4] Axel L. Cerebral Blood Flow Determination by Rapid-Sequence Computed Tomography. A Theoretical Analysis. Radiology 137: 679-686 (1980). Cerca con Google

[5] Barbier E.L., Lamalle L., Decorps M. Methodology of Brain Perfusion Imaging. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 13: 496-520 (2001). Cerca con Google

[6] Bell B.M., Pillonetto G. Estimating Parameters and Stochastic Functions of One Variable Using Nonlinear Measurements Model. Inverse Problems 20: 627-646 (2004). Cerca con Google

[7] Benner T., Heiland S., Erb G., Forsting M., Sartor K. Accuracy of Gamma-variate Fits to Concentration-time Curves from Dynamic Susceptibility-Contrast Enhanced MRI: Influence of Time Resolution, Maximal Signal Drop and Signal-to-noise. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 15: 307-317 (1997). Cerca con Google

[8] Bertoldo A., Corazza S., Zanderigo F., Pillonetto G., Cosottini M., Cobelli C. Assessment of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow By Bolus-Tracking MRI Images: Characterization of the Tissue Residue Function Using Nonlinear Stochastic Regularization Method. Proceedings of MEDICON Ischia (NA), Italy, 31 July-5 August (2004). Cerca con Google

[9] Bertoldo A., Zanderigo F., Cobelli C. Assessment of Cerebral Blood Flow, Volume, and Mean Transit Time from Bolus-tracking MRI Images: Theory and Practise. In Advanced Image Processing in Magnetic Resonance Imaging, L. Landini Editor, Marcel Dekker Signal Processing and Communications Series, New York, NY, USA (2005). Cerca con Google

[10] Boxerman J.L., Hamberg L.M., Rosen B.R., Weisskoff R.M. MR Contrast due to Intravascular Magnetic Susceptibility Perturbations. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 34: 555-566 (1995). Cerca con Google

[11] Brunecker P., Villringer A., Schultze J., Nolte C.H., Jungehulsing G.J., Endres M., Steinbrink J. Correcting saturation effects of the arterial input function in dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI - a Monte Carlo simulation. Magnetic Resonance Imaging 25: 1300-1311 (2007). Cerca con Google

[12] Butman J.A., Tasciyan T. Automated computation of the arterial input function for dynamic susceptibility bolus tracking brain perfusion MRI. Proceedings of ISMRM 134th Scientific Meeting and Exhibition, Miami, Florida, USA, 7-13 May (2005). Cerca con Google

[13] Calamante F., Thomas D.L., Pell G.S., Wiersma J., Turner R. Review Article: Measuring Cerebral Blood Flow Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 19: 701-735 (1999). Cerca con Google

[14] Calamante F., Gadian D.G., Connelly A. Delay and Dispersion Effects in Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI: Simulations using Singular Value Decomposition. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 44: 466-473 (2000). Cerca con Google

[15] Calamante F., Ganesan V., Kirkham F.J., Jan W., Chong W.K., Gadian D.G., Connelly A. MR Perfusion Imaging in Moyamoya Syndrome: Potential Implications for Clinical Evaluation of Occlusive Cerebrovascular Disease. Stroke 32: 2810-2816 (2001). Cerca con Google

[16] Calamante F., Gadian D.G., Connelly A. Quantification of Perfusion using Bolus Tracking Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Stroke: Assumptions, Limitations, and Potential Implications for Clinical Use. Stroke 33: 1146-1151 (2002). Cerca con Google

[17] Calamante F., Gadian D.G., Connelly A. Quantification of Bolus-Tracking MRI: Improved Characterization of the Tissue Residue Function Using Tikhonov Regularization. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 50: 1237-1247 (2003). Cerca con Google

[18] Calamante F., Yim P.J., Cebral J.R. Estimation of Bolus Dispersion Effects in Perfusion MRI using Image-based Computational Fluid Dynamics. NeuroImage 19: 341-353 (2003). Cerca con Google

[19] Calamante F., Willats L., Gadian D.G:, Connelly A. Bolus Delay and Dispersion in Perfusion MRI: Implications for Tissue Predictor Models in Stroke. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 55: 1180-1185 (2006). Cerca con Google

[20] Calamante F., Morup M., Hansen L.K. Defining a Local Arterial Input Function for Perfusion MRI using Independent Component Analysis. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 52: 789-797 (2004). Cerca con Google

[21] Carpenter T.K., Armitage P.A., Bastin M.E.,Wardlaw J.M. Dsc Perfusion MRI - Quantification and Reduction of Systematic Errors Arising in Areas of Reduced Cerebral Blood Flow. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 55: 1342-1349 (2006). Cerca con Google

[22] Carroll T.J., Teneggi V., Jobin M., Squassante L., Treyer V., Hany T.F., Burger C., Wang L., Bye A., Von Schulthess G.K., Buck A. Absolute Quantification of Cerebral Blood Flow with Magnetic Resonance: Reproducibility of the Method, and Comparison with H2(15)O Positron Emission Tomography. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 22: 1149-1156 (2002). Cerca con Google

[23] Carroll T.J., Rowley H.A., Haughton V.M. Automatic Calculation of the Arterial Input Function for Cerebral Perfusion Imaging with MR Imaging. Radiology 227:593-600 (2003). Cerca con Google

[24] Cha S., Lu S., Johnson G., Knopp E.A. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MR Imaging: Correlation of Signal Intensity Changes with Cerebral Blood Volume Measurements. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 11: 114-119 (2000). Cerca con Google

[25] De Nicolao G., Sparacino G., Cobelli C. Nonparametric Input Estimation in Physiological Systems: Problems, Methods, and Case Studies. Automatica 33: 851-870 (1997). Cerca con Google

[26] De Nicolao G., Sparacino G., Cobelli C. Stima di Secrezione di Ormoni e Produzione di Substrati Mediante Deconvoluzione. In Bioingengeria dei Sistemi Metabolici, GNB, Patron Editore, Bologna, Italy, p. 137-150 (1998). Cerca con Google

[27] De Nicolao G., Pillonetto G., Chierici M., Cobelli C. Efficient Nonparametric Population Modeling for Large Data Sets. Proceedings of American Control Conference,New York City, New York, USA, July 9-13 (2007). Cerca con Google

[28] De Nicolao G., Pillonetto G. A new kernel-based approach for system identification. Proceedings of American Control Conference,Seattle, Washington, USA, June 11-13 (2008). Cerca con Google

[29] Duhamel G., Schlaug G., Alsop D.C. Measurement of Arterial Input Functions for Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging using Echo-Planar Images: Comparison of Physical Simulations with in Vivo Results. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 55: 514-523 (2006). Cerca con Google

[30] Ellinger R., Kremser C., Schocke M.F., Kolbitsch C., Grieber J., Felber S.R., Aichner F.T. The Impact of Peak Saturation of the Arterial Input Function on Quantitative Evaluation of Dynamic Ssceptibility Contrastenhanced MR Studies. Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography 24: 942-948 (2000). Cerca con Google

[31] Garulli A., Vicino A., Zappa G. Conditional central algorithms for worst case set- membership identification and filtering. IEEE Transactions on Automatic control 45(1): 14-23 (2000). Cerca con Google

[32] Goodwin G., Braslavsky J., Seron M. Non-stationary stochastic embedding for transfer function estimation. Automatica 38: 47-62 (2002). Cerca con Google

[33] Gr¨uner R., Bjørnar°a B.T., Moen G., Taxt T. Magnetic Resonance Brain Perfusion Imaging with Voxel-Specific Arterial Input Functions. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 23: 273-284 (2006). Cerca con Google

[34] Hoppel B.E., Weiskoff R.M., Thulborn K.R., Moore J.B., Kwong K.K., Rosen B.R. Measurement of regional blood oxygenation and cerebral hemodynamics. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 30: 715-723 (1993). Cerca con Google

[35] Ibaraki M., Shimosegawa E., Toyoshima H., Takahashi K., Miura S., Kanno I. Tracer Delay Correction of Cerebral Blood Flow with Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast-enhanced MRI. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 25: 378-390 (2005). Cerca con Google

[36] Ibaraki M., Ito H., Shimosegawa E., Toyoshima H., Ishigame K., Takanashi K., Kanno I., Miura S. Cerebral Vascular Mean Transit Time in Healthy Humans: a Comparative Study with PET and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast-enhanced MRI. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 1-10 (2006). Cerca con Google

[37] Ito H., Kanno I., Kato C., Sasaki T., Ishii K., Ouchi Y., Iida A., Okazawa H., Hayashida K., Tsuyuguchi N., Ishii K., Kuwabara Y., Senda M. Database of Normal Human Cerebral Blood Flow, Cerebral Blood Volume, Cerebral Oxygen Extraction Fraction and Cerebral Metabolic Rate of Oxygen measured by Positron Emission Tomography with 15O-labelled Carbon Dioxide or Water, Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen: a Multicenter Study in Japan. Eurepean Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 31(5): 635-643 (2004). Cerca con Google

[38] Kennan R.P., J¨ager H.R. T2- and T2*-W DCE-MRI: Blood Perfusion and Volume Estimation using Bolus Tracking. In Quantitative MRI of the Brain, Edited by Paul Tofts, JohnWiley and Sons, Ltd, p. 365-412 (2003). Cerca con Google

[39] Kiselev V.G. On the Theoretical Basis of Perfusion Measurements by Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 46: 1113-1122 (2001). Cerca con Google

[40] Kiselev V.G. Transverse Relaxation Effect of Contrast Agent: a Crucial Issue for Quantitative Measurements. In Proceedings of ISMRM Workshop on Quantitative Cerebral Perfusion Imaging Using MRI: A Technical Perspective, Venice, Italy, March 21-23, pp. 6-9 (2004). Cerca con Google

[41] Kjølby B.F., Østergaard L., Kiselev V.G. Theoretical Model of Intravascular Paramagnetic Tracers Effect on Tissue Relaxation. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 56: 187-197 (2006). Cerca con Google

[42] Landis C.S., Li X. et al. Determination of the MRI Contrast Agent Concentration Time Course In Vivo following Bolus Injection: Effect of Equilibrium Transcytolemmal Water Exchange. Magneti Resonance in Medicine 44: 563-574 (2000). Cerca con Google

[43] Larson K.B., Perman W.H., Perlmutter J.S., Gado M.H., Zierler, K.L. Tracer-kinetic Analysis for Measuring Regional Cerebral Blood Flow by Dynamic Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Journal of Theoretical Biology 170: 1-14 (1994). Cerca con Google

[44] Leenders K.L., Perani D., Lammertsma A.A., Heather J.D., Buckingham P., Healy M.J., Gibbs J.M., Wise R.J., Hatazawa J., Herold S., Beany R.P., Brooks D.J., Sprinks T., Rhodes C., Franckowiak R.S.J., Jones T. Cerebral blood flow, blood volume and oxygen utilization. Normal values and effect of age. Brain 113: 27-47 (1990). Cerca con Google

[45] Lin W., Celik A., Derdeyn C., An H., Lee Y., Videen T., Østergaard L., Powers W.J. Quantitative Measurements of Cerebral Blood Flow in Patients with Unilateral Carotid Artery Occlusion: a PET and MR Study. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 14: 659-667 (2001). Cerca con Google

[46] Liu H.L., Pu Y., Liu Y., Nickerson L., Andrews T., Fox P.T., Gao J.H. Cerebral Blood Flow Measurement by Dynamic Contrast MRI using Singular Value Decomposition with an Adaptive Threshold. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 42: 167-172(1999). Cerca con Google

[47] Ljung L. Model validation and model error modelling. Proceedings of Astrom symposium on control, Studentliteratur, Lund, Sweden. 15-42 (1999). Cerca con Google

[48] Lorenz C., Benner T., Lopez C.J., Ay H., Zhu M.W., Aronen H., Karonen J., Liu Y., Nuutinen J., Sorensen A.G. Effect of Using Local Arterial Input Functions on Cerebral Blood Flow Estimation. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 24: 57-65 (2006). Cerca con Google

[49] Marstrand J.R., Rostrup E., Rosenbaum S., Garde E., Larsson H.B. Cerebral hemodynamic changes measured by gradient-echo or spin-echo bolus tracking and its correlation to changes in ICA blood flow measured by phase-mapping. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 14: 391-400 (2001). Cerca con Google

[50] Meier P., Zierler K.L. On the Theory of the Indicator-Dilution Method for Measurement of Blood Flow and Volume. Journal of Applied Physiology 6: 731-744 (1954). Cerca con Google

[51] Mlynash M., Eyngorn I. Bammer R., Moseley M., Tong D.C. Automated Method for Generating the Arterial Input Function on Perfusion-weighted MR Imaging: Validation in Patients with Stroke. American Journal of Neuroradiology 26: 1479-1486 (2005). Cerca con Google

[52] Mouridsen K., Christensen S., Gyldensted L., Østergaard L. Automatic Selection of Arterial Input Function using Cluster Analysis. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 55: 524-531 (2006). Cerca con Google

[53] Mouridsen K., Friston K., Hjort N., Gyldensted L., Østergaard L., Kiebelb S. Bayesian estimation of cerebral perfusion using a physiological model of microvasculature. NeuroImage 33:570-579 (2006). Cerca con Google

[54] Mukherjee P., Kang H.C., Videen T.O., McKinstry R.C., Powers W.J., Derdeyn C.P. Measurement of Cerebral Blood Flow in Chronic Carotid Occlusive Disease: Comparison of Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion MR Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography. American Journal of Neuroradiology 24: 862-871 (2003). Cerca con Google

[55] Murase K., Kikuchi K., Miki H., Shimizu T., Ikezoe J. Determination of Arterial Input Function using Fuzzy Clustering for Quantification of Cerebral Blood Flow with Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 13: 797-806 (2001). Cerca con Google

[56] Murase K., Shinohara M., Yamazaki Y. Accuracy of Deconvolution Analysis Based on Singular Value Decomposition for Quantification of Cerebral Blood Flow using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Physics in Medicine and Biology 46: 3147-3159 (2001). Cerca con Google

[57] Murase K., Yamazaki Y., Shinohara M. Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) Model Applied to Quantification of Cerebral Blood Flow Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Magnetic Resonance in Medical Sciences 2(2): 85-95 (2003). Cerca con Google

[58] Murase K., Yamazaki Y., Shohei M. Deconvolution Analysis of Dynamic Contrast-enhanced Data Based on Singular Value Decomposition Optimized by Generalized Cross Validation. Magnetic Resonance in Medical Sciences 3(4): 165-175 (2004). Cerca con Google

[59] Neve M., De Nicolao G., Marchesi L. Nonparametric Identification of Population Models via Gaussian Processes. Automatica 43: 1134-1144 (2007). Cerca con Google

[60] Newman G.C., Hospod F.E., Patlak C.S., Fain S.E., Pulfer K.A. Cool T.D., OSullivan F. Experimental Estimates of the Constants Relating Signal Change to Contrast Concentration for Cerebral Blood Volume by T2* MRI. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 26: 760-770 (2006). Cerca con Google

[61] Østergaard L., Weisskoff R.M., Chesler D.A., Gyldensted C.,Rosen B.R. High Resolution Measurements of Cerebral Blood Flow using Intravascular Tracer Bolus Passages. Part I: Mathematical Approach and Statistical Analysis. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 36: 715-725 (1996). Cerca con Google

[62] Østergaard L., Sorensen A.G., Kwong K.K., Weisskoff R.M., Gyldensted C.,Rosen B.R. High Resolution Measurements of Cerebral Blood Flow using Intravascular Tracer Bolus Passages. Part II: Experimental Comparison and Preliminary Results. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 36: 726-736 (1996). Cerca con Google

[63] Østergaard L., Johannsen P., Host-Poulsen P., Vestergaard-Poulsen P., Asboe H., Gee A.D., Hansen S.B., Cold G.E., Gjedde A., Gyldensted C. Cerebral Blood Flow Measurements by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Bolus Tracking: Comparison with [15O]H2O Positron Emission Tomography in Humans. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 18: 935-940 (1998). Cerca con Google

[64] Østergaard L., Smith D.F., Vestergaard-Poulsen P., Hansen S.B., Gee A.D., Gjedde A., Gyldensted C. Absolute Cerebral Blood Flow and Blood Volume Measured by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Bolus Tracking: Comparison with Positron Emission Tomography Values. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 18: 425-432 (1998). Cerca con Google

[65] Østergaard L., Chesler D.A., Weisskoff R.M., Sorensen A.G., Rosen B.R. Modeling Cerebral Blood Flow and Flow Heterogeneity From Magnetic Resonance Residue Data. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 19: 690-699 (1999). Cerca con Google

[66] Peruzzo D., Bertoldo A., Zanderigo F., Cobelli C. Automatic Selection of Arterial Input Function on Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MRI Images: Comparison of Different Methods. Proceedings of ISMRM 14th Scientific Meeting and Exhibition, Seattle, Washington, USA, 6-12 May (2006). Cerca con Google

[67] Pillonetto G., Sparacino G., Cobelli C. Handling Non-Negativity in Deconvolution of Physiological Signals: a Nonlinear Stochastic Approach. Annals of Biomedical Engineering 30: 1077-1087 (2002). Cerca con Google

[68] Pillonetto G., Chiuso A., De Nicolao G. Identification and prediction of linear dynamical systems: a learning theory approach. Proceedings of International Conference on Mathematical Problems in Engineering, Aerospace and Sciences, Genova, Italy, June 25-27 (2008). Cerca con Google

[69] Pillonetto G., Chiuso A., De Nicolao G. Predictor estimation via Gaussian regression. Proceedings of Conference on Control and Decision Systems, Cancun, Mexico, (2008). Cerca con Google

[70] Porkka L., Neuder M., Hunter G., Weisskoff R.M., Belliveau J., Rosen, B.R. Arterial Input Function Measurement with MRI. In Proceedings of The Society of Magnetic Resonance Medicine, 10th Annual Meeting, San Francisco, California, USA, p. 120 (1991). Cerca con Google

[71] Rausch M. Scheffler K., Rudin M., Radu E.W. Analysis of Input Functiond from Different Arterial Branches with Gamma Variate Functions and Cluster Analysis for Quantitative Blood Volume Measurements. Magnetic Resonance Imaging 18: 1235-1243 (2000). Cerca con Google

[72] Rempp K.A., Brix G., Wenz F., Becker C.R., G¨uckel F., Lorenz W.J. Quantification of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow and Volume with Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging. Radiology 193: 637-641 (1994). Cerca con Google

[73] Schreiber W.G., Guckel F., Stritzke P., Schmiedek P., Schwartz A., Brix G. Cerebral Blood Flow and Cerebrovascular Reserve Capacity: Estimation by Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 18: 1143–1156 (1998). Cerca con Google

[74] Simonsen C.Z., Østergaard L., Smith D.F., Vestergaard-Poulsen P., Gyldensted C. Comparison of Gradient- and Spin-Echo Imaging: CBF, CBV and MTT Measurements by Bolus Tracking.Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 12: 411-416 (2000). Cerca con Google

[75] Smith A.M., Grandin C.B., Duprez T., Mataigne F., Cosnard G. Whole Brain Quantitative CBF and CBV Measurements using MRI Bolus Tracking: Comparison of Methodologies. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 43: 559-564 (2000). Cerca con Google

[76] Smith M.R., Lu H., Frayne R. Signal-to-Noise Ratio Effects in Quantitative Cerebral Perfusion Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Agents. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 49: 122-128 (2003). Cerca con Google

[77] Sorensen A.G.What is theMeaning of Quantitative CBF? American Journal of Neuroradiology 22: 235-236 (2001). Cerca con Google

[78] Sourbron S., Luypaert R., Van Schuerbeek P., Dujardin, M. Stadnik, T. Osteaux M. Deconvolution of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI data by Linear Inversion: Choice of the Regularization Parameter. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 52: 209-213 (2004). Cerca con Google

[79] Stewart G.N. Researches on the Circulation Time in Organs and on the Influences which affect it. Parts I-III. Journal of Physiology 15: 1-89 (1894). Cerca con Google

[80] Tofts P.S. Modeling Tracer Kinetics in Dynamic Gd-DTPA MR Imaging. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 7: 91-101 (1997). Cerca con Google

[81] Van Osch M.J., Vonken E.J., Bakker C.J., Viergever M.A. Correcting Partial Volume Artifacts of the Arterial Input Function in Quantitative Cerebral Perfusion MRI. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 45: 477-485 (2001). Cerca con Google

[82] Van Osch M.J., Vonken E.J., Wu O., Viergever M.A., van der Grond J.,Bakker C.J. Model of the Human Vasculature for Studying the Influence of Contrast Injection Speed on Cerebral Perfusion MRI. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 50: 614-622 (2003). Cerca con Google

[83] Van Osch M.J.P., Vonken E.P.A. , Viergever M.A., Van Der Grond J., Bakker C.J.G. Measuring the Arterial Input Function with Gradient Echo Sequences. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 49: 1067-1076 (2003). Cerca con Google

[84] Vonken E.P.A., Beekman F.J., Bakker C.J.G., Viergever M.A. Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Cerebral Blood Flow in Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 41: 343-350 (1999). Cerca con Google

[85] Willats L., Connelly A., Calamante F. Improved Deconvolution of Perfusion MRI Data in the Presence of Bolus Delay and Dispersion. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 56: 146-156 (2006). Cerca con Google

[86] Wirestam R., Andersson L., Østergaard L., Bolling M., Aunola J.P., Lindgren A., Geijer B., Holtas S., Stahlberg F. Assessment of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow by Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI using Different Deconvolution Techniques. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 43: 691-700 (2000). Cerca con Google

[87] Wirestam R., Stahlberg F. Wavelet-based Noise Reduction for Improved Deconvolution of Time-series Data in Dynamic Susceptibility-Contrast MRI. MAGMA 18: 113-118 (2005). Cerca con Google

[88] Wu O., Østergaard L., Weisskoff R.M., Benner T., Rosen B.R., Sorensen A.G. Tracer Arrival Timing-Insensitive Technique for Estimating Flow in MR Perfusion-Weighted Imaging Using Singular Value Decomposition with a Block-Circulant Deconvolution Matrix. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 50: 164-174 (2003). Cerca con Google

[89] Wu O., Østergaard L., Koroshetz W.J., Schwamm L.H., ODonnell J.O., Schaefer P.W., Rosen P., Weisskoff R.M., Sorensen A.G. Effects of Tracer Arrival Time on Flow Esimates in MR Perfusio-Weighted Imaging. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 50: 856-864 (2003). Cerca con Google

[90] Zanderigo F., Bertoldo A., Pillonetto G., Cosottini M., Cobelli C. Nonlinear Stochastic Regularization to Characterize Tissue Residue Function from Bolus-tracking MRI Images. In Proceedings of ISMRM Workshop on Quantitative Cerebral Perfusion Imaging Using MRI: A Technical Per- spective, Venice, Italy, March 21-23, pp. 77-78 (2004). Cerca con Google

[91] Zanderigo F., Bertoldo A., Pillonetto G., Cobelli C. Nonlinear Stochastic Deconvolution of Bolus-Tracking MRI: Assessment and Comparison on Simulated Data vs other Methods in Presence/Absence of Dispersion. Proceedings of ISMRM 13th Scientific Meeting and Exhibition, Miami, Florida, USA, 7-13 May (2005). Cerca con Google

[92] Zanderigo F., Bertoldo A., Pillonetto G., Cobelli C. Detection of Dispersion from Bolus-tracking MRI Improves Cerebral Blood Flow Quantification: a Simulation Study. Proceedings of ISMRM 14th Scientific Meeting and Exhibition, Seattle, Washington, USA, 6-12 May (2006). Cerca con Google

[93] Zanderigo F., Bertoldo A., Cobelli C. A Log-normal dispersion model for parametric deconvolution of DSC-MRI images: assessment on simulated data. ISMRM 15th Scientific Meeting and Exhibition, Berlin, Germany, 19-25 May (2007). Cerca con Google

[94] Zanderigo F., Bertoldo A., Pillonetto G., Cobelli C. Nonlinear Stochastic Regularization to Characterize Tissue Residue Function in Bolus-Tracking MRI: Assessment and Comparison with SVD, Block-Circulant SVD and Tikhonov IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, in press (2009). Cerca con Google

[95] Zierler K.L. Theoretical Basis of Indicator-Dilution Methods for Measuring Flow and Volume. Circulation Research 10: 393-407 (1962). Cerca con Google

[96] Zierler K.L. Equations for Measuring Blood Flow by External Monitoring of Radioisotopes. Circulation Research 16: 309-321 (1965). Cerca con Google

Download statistics

Solo per lo Staff dell Archivio: Modifica questo record