Go to the content. | Move to the navigation | Go to the site search | Go to the menu | Contacts | Accessibility

| Create Account

Turella, L (2009) "The neural correlates of grasping actions:observation and execution". [Ph.D. thesis]

Full text disponibile come:

[img]
Preview
PDF Document (tesi dottorato) - Submitted Version
3436Kb

Abstract (english)

Summary
The aim of the present thesis was to shed further light on the properties characterizing the neural system underlying action understanding in humans. This was done in terms of both pure action observation and “mirror” type of activity by means of functional resonance imaging (fMRI). In first instance, I conducted a series of studies in which participants were simply asked to observe a model’s grasping action while their brain was scanned. Here the targeted neural system was the action observation system (AOS), a network of regions automatically recruited during the observation of action performed by others (Buccino et al., 2001). In second instance, the performed experimentation involved the recording of the participants’ neural activity during both the observation and the execution of grasping actions. Here the targeted neural system was the so called “mirror” system (Rizzolatti & Craighero, 2004).
To start with, I considered the investigation of the AOS in a population affected by a severe neurological disorder, i.e. early relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients (Chapter 3). During scanning, participants simply observed images depicting a human hand either grasping an object or resting alongside an object. Although previous evidence indicates a selective impairment of the AOS in MS patients, the present findings are not suggestive of any specific deficit at the level of this system in these patients. Rather, they showed a general, but unspecific, effect of BOLD over-activation which was probably determined by the extensive demyelination caused by the disease and by the consequent repairing process carried out by our organism. Such unspecific over-activation has been discussed in terms of the spared ability of the AOS to re-enact stored motor representations which might be used for rehabilitating motor control in RRMS (action observation therapy; Ertelt et al., 2007; Buccino, Solodkin, & Small, 2006).
In the second experimental chapter (Chapter 4), I focused on a more basic feature of the human AOS, the coding of not-object-related (intransitive) actions. This is a unique feature of the human AOS, because in non-human primates the AOS seems not to code for such types of actions. The central advance of this study is the demonstration that transitivity conveyed by previous knowledge regarding the presence/absence of a target-object modulates activity within the AOS. By manipulating this type of information we revealed that the AOS is able to generate a representation of an observed action on the basis of the action goal, even when the most crucial part of the action (i.e., hand-object interaction) is not visible. A number of studies put forward the proposal that the human AOS responds to intransitive actions (Buccino et al., 2001; Wheaton, Thompson, Syngeniotis, Abbott, & Puce, 2004; Dinstein, Hasson, Rubin, & Heeger, 2007; Dinstein, Gardner, Jazayeri, & Heeger, 2008; Lui, et al., 2008) suggesting that when a target-object is not present the AOS is still recruited. The present study add to this literature revealing that the AOS has the ability to discriminate and understand observed actions on the basis of the properties characterizing their goal (i.e. transitivity) rather than their perceived physical features. In this sense, we were able to find a modulation within the AOS with respect to the transitivity, suggesting that at least part of the system can be extremely selective in terms of processing the abstract properties of the goal characterizing the observed action.
The two final experimental Chapters (Chapters 5 and 6) of the present thesis were concerned with the definition/identification of the human “mirror” regions and (if any) of what they code for. In general, the present results support the notion that in humans “mirror” activity spreads across a number of areas which exceeds those classically thought to be part of the ‘mirror’ system (e.g., Raos, Evangeliou, & Savaki, 2007; Gazzola, Rizzolatti, Wicker, & Keysers, 2007; Gazzola & Keysers, 2009; Evangeliou, Raos, Galletti, & Savaki, 2009). Further, a region of interest analysis (ROI) on the putative human mirror region within the premotor cortex indicate that, in contrast to monkeys (Nelissen, Luppino, Vanduffel, Rizzolatti, & Orban, 2005), this region is activated in a similar fashion irrespective of whether the agent's entire body, or only the grasping hand, is seen.
Altogether these results are discussed in terms of the possibility that the AOS and the ‘mirror’ systems chiefly represent actions in terms of goals independently by contextual information (Ferrari, Rozzi, & Fogassi, 2005; Gazzola et al., 2007). The idea is that what is represented in the premotor cortex is not bounded to the physical appearance of the agent, but it is a rather abstract representation centred on the goal of the action, independently of what is acting, a human, a robot, or even a tool. The present findings confirm and extend this notion by broadening the several dimensions within which action goals affect the response of the AOS and how such dimensions may vary across species. Indeed on the basis of monkeys fMRI findings using a paradigm similar to ours (Nelissen et al., 2005) differences in action observation activity depending on type of view were expected, at least within premotor and other prefrontal areas. However, in the present study the type of view had little impact at the level of action observation. I suspect that this might be ascribed to the fact that the processing of particular stimulus properties, which in principle should occur in homologue areas, might not be common to both species (Sereno & Tootell, 2005; Orban, Van Essen, & Vanduffel, 2004; Nakahara, Adachi, Osada, & Miyashita, 2007). In this perspective the conclusion would be that in humans the observation of a grasping hand alone (and an object) is sufficient to trigger significant differential activity. This aspect is particularly important because most of the human studies on the mirror neuron system have been conducted with movies zooming into the hand-part of the stimulus. If, as monkeys’ fMRI indicated (Nelissen et al., 2005), this were to cancel out key mirror areas, much of the human literature would have been challenged. The present data, however, show convincingly that this is not the case, at least in humans, and therefore enhance the validity of a large number of studies providing important and novel evidence within this flourishing field of research.








References

Buccino, G., Binkofski, F., Fink, G.R., Fadiga, L., Fogassi, L., Gallese, V., et al., (2001). Action observation activates premotor and parietal areas in a somatotopic manner: an fMRI study. European Journal of Neuroscience, 13, 400–404.

Buccino, G., Solodkin, A., & Small, S. (2006). Functions of the mirror neuron system: implications for neurorehabilitation. Cognitive and behavioral neurology, 19, 55-63.

Dinstein, I., Hasson, U., Rubin, N., & Heeger, D.J. (2007). Brain areas selective for both observed and executed movements. Journal of Neurophysiology, 98, 1415–1427.

Dinstein, I., Gardner, J.L., Jazayeri, M. & Heeger, D.J. (2008). Executed and observed movements have different distributed representations in human aIPS. Journal of Neuroscience, 28, 11231–11239.

Ertelt, D., Small, S., Solodkin, A., Dettmers, C., McNamara, A., & Buccino, G. (2007). Action observation has a positive impact on rehabilitation of motor deficits after stroke. NeuroImage, 36, T164-173.

Evangeliou, M.N., Raos, V., Galletti, C., & Savaki, H.E. (2009). Functional imaging of the parietal cortex during action execution and observation. Cerebral Cortex, 19, 624–639.

Ferrari, P.F., Rozzi, S. & Fogassi, L. (2005). Mirror neurons responding to observation of actions made with tools in monkey ventral premotor cortex. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 17, 212-226.
Gazzola, V., Rizzolatti, G., Wicker, B. & Keysers, C. (2007). The anthropomorphic brain: The mirror neuron system responds to human and robotic actions. NeuroImage, 35, 1674-1684.

Gazzola, V., & Keysers, C. (2009). The observation and execution of actions share motor and somatosensory voxels in all tested subjects: single-subject analyses of unsmoothed fMRI data. Cerebral Cortex, 19, 1239-55.
Lui, F., Buccino, G., Duzzi, D., Benuzzi, F., Crisi, G., Baraldi, P., et al. (2008). Neural substrates for observing and imagining non-object-directed actions. Social Neuroscience, 3, 261-75.

Nakahara, K., Adachi, Y., Osada, T., & Miyashita, Y. (2007). Exploring the neural basis of cognition: multi-modal links between human fMRI and macaque neurophysiology. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 11, 84–92.

Nelissen, K., Luppino, G., Vanduffel, W., Rizzolatti, G., & Orban, G. A. (2005). Observing others: multiple action representation in the frontal lobe. Science, 310, 332-336.

Orban, G.A., Van Essen, D., & Vanduffel, W. (2004). Comparative mapping of higher visual areas in monkeys and humans. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 8, 315–324.

Raos, V., Evangeliou, M.N., & Savaki, H.E. (2007). Mental simulation of action in the service of action perception. Journal of Neuroscience, 27, 12675-12683.

Rizzolatti, G., Fogassi, L., & Gallese, V. (2001). Neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the understanding and imitation of action. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 2, 661–670.

Sereno, M.I. & Tootell, R.B. (2005). From monkeys to humans: what do we now know about brain homologies? Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 15, 135-144.

Wheaton, K.J., Thompson, J.C., Syngeniotis, A., Abbott, D.F., & Puce, A. (2004). Viewing the motion of human body parts activates different regions of premotor, temporal, and parietal cortex. NeuroImage, 22, 277-88.

Abstract (italian)

Riassunto
L’obiettivo della presente tesi è quello di investigare le proprietà del sistema neurale sottostante la comprensione delle azioni nell’uomo. I miei studi si sono concentrati sull’attività cerebrale sottostante l’osservazione dell’azione e in relazione al cosiddetto sistema “mirror”, attraverso l’uso della tecnica della risonanza magnetica funzionale (fMRI).
Nella prima parte sperimentale della tesi (capitoli 3-4) sono descritti alcuni studi in cui ai soggetti sperimentali veniva richiesto di osservare una persona che afferrava degli oggetti, mentre l’attività del loro cervello era registrata. Questo tipo di compito permette di studiare il cosiddetto sistema di osservazione dell’azione (AOS), un network di regioni cerebrali attivato automaticamente durante l’osservazione di azioni compiute da altre persone (Buccino et al., 2001).
Nella seconda parte sperimentale della tesi (capitoli 5-6), gli studi si sono focalizzati sulla raccolta di dati di attivazione cerebrale in soggetti che dovevano portare a termine compiti sia di osservazione sia di esecuzione di movimenti di raggiungimento e prensione. In questi esperimenti, il substrato neurale investigato è il cosiddetto sistema “mirror” (Rizzolatti & Craighero, 2004).
Nel primo capitolo sperimentale (capitolo 3) ho studiato l’AOS in una popolazione di pazienti affetti da Sclerosi Multipla (SM) del tipo Recidivante-Remittente. Durante l’acquisizione dei dati fMRI, i soggetti dovevano semplicemente osservare immagini statiche di mani che afferravano oggetti comuni o che erano posizionate a fianco di tali oggetti.
Studi precedenti sembrano indicare un danno selettivo dell’AOS nei pazienti con SM, ma i risultati di questo studio non suggeriscono tale deterioramento in questo tipo di soggetti. Essi sembrano indicare invece un generale effetto di iperattivazione cerebrale, che potrebbe essere determinata dalla estesa demielinizzazione causata dalla SM e dai processi di riparazione messi in atto dall’organismo. Questa iperattivazione cerebrale non specifica è stata discussa nei termini di capacità residua dell’AOS per riattivare nuovamente le rappresentazioni motorie e quindi della possibilità di usare l’osservazione dell’azione come strumento di riabilitazione per tali pazienti (terapia basata sull’osservazione dell’azione, Buccino, Solodkin, & Small, 2006; Ertelt, Small, Solodkin, Dettmers, McNamara, & Buccino, 2007).
Nel secondo capitolo sperimentale (capitolo 4), mi sono concentrato sullo studio di una proprietà basica dell’AOS, cioè l’elaborazione di azioni intransitive (non dirette verso oggetti). L’elaborazione di questo tipo di azioni, sembra essere una caratteristica peculiare dell’AOS umano, in quanto nelle scimmie questo tipo di azione non sembra attivare l’AOS. Il punto centrale di questo studio è la dimostrazione che la transitività fornita dalla conoscenza della presenza o assenza dietro una partizione di un oggetto, che deve essere afferrato, modula l’attività dell’AOS.
Manipolando questo tipo di informazione siamo stati in grado di dimostrare che l’AOS è in grado di generare una rappresentazione dell’azione osservata basata sullo scopo di tale azione, anche nel caso in cui la parte più cruciale di tale movimento, l’interazione tra la mano e l’oggetto, era nascosta da una partizione.
Precedenti studi di neuroimmagine hanno dimostrato che l’AOS umano codifica azioni di tipo intransitivo (Buccino et al., 2001; Wheaton, Thompson, Syngeniotis, Abbott, & Puce, 2004; Dinstein, Hasson, Rubin, & Heeger, 2007; Dinstein, Gardner, Jazayeri, & Heeger, 2008; Lui, Buccino, Duzzi, Benuzzi, Crisi, Baraldi, et al., 2008), suggerendo che anche quando l’oggetto, scopo dell’azione, non è presente, l’AOS è comunque attivato.
Questo studio dimostra come l’AOS discrimini, e quindi possa permettere di comprendere le azioni osservate sulla base delle caratteristiche dello scopo dell’azione (in questo caso la transitività) piuttosto che da caratteristiche percettive. In questo senso, la modulazione prodotta dalla transitività nell’AOS suggerisce che almeno una sua parte sia estremamente sensibile alle proprietà astratte dello scopo di tale azione.
Negli ultimi due capitoli sperimentali della tesi (capitoli 5 e 6) mi sono concentrato sull’identificazione delle possibili regioni “mirror” nel cervello umano e, se presenti, sulle caratteristiche dei processi che avvengono in tali aree. In generale, i risultati qui riportati supportano la presenza di un sistema “mirror” nell’uomo, che comprende un numero di aree maggiore rispetto a quelle che classicamente vengono considerate “mirror” (Raos, Evangeliou, & Savaki, 2007; Gazzola, Rizzolatti, Wicker, & Keysers, 2007; Gazzola & Keysers, 2009; Evangeliou, Raos, Galletti, & Savaki, 2009). I dati del presente esperimento sembrano supportare l’idea che è lo scopo dell’azione ad essere il determinante principale dell’attivazione relativa all’osservazione dell’azione.
Inoltre, l’analisi dei dati di una singola area, la possibile omologa umana della regione mirror F5 nelle scimmie, sembra indicare che al contrario di questa specie (Nelissen, Luppino, Vanduffel, Rizzolatti, & Orban, 2005), nell’uomo quest’area è attivata in un modo simile indipendentemente dall’agente che compie l’azione. La stessa attivazione cerebrale è presente sia che l’agente sia un modello intero, sia che l’agente sia una mano isolata.
I miei risultati sono stati discussi considerando che l’AOS e il sistema “mirror” rappresentano l’azione rispetto al suo scopo e indipendentemente dall’informazione in cui l’azione viene eseguita (Ferrari, Rozzi, & Fogassi, 2005; Gazzola et al., 2007). In particolare, la rappresentazione dell’azione osservata nella corteccia premotoria non sembra essere legata all’apparenza percettiva dell’agente, ma essa sembra essere di tipo astratto, centrata sullo scopo dell’azione e non influenzata da cosa stia compiendo l’azione, sia esso un essere umano, un robot o un attrezzo. Sulla base dei risultati di uno studio fMRI nelle scimmie simile al mio (Nelissen et al., 2005) mi aspettavo di trovare delle differenze nell’attività relativa all’osservazione dell’azione almeno in aree premotorie e prefrontali. Ma nel mio studio il tipo di agente non ha avuto nessun impatto sull’attivazione cerebrale. Questo probabilmente può essere dovuto al fatto che l’elaborazione delle proprietà di uno stimolo, che dovrebbe avvenire in aree omologhe, può essere differente in specie diverse (Sereno & Tootell, 2005; Orban, Van Essen, & Vanduffel, 2004; Nakahara, Adachi, Osada, & Miyashita, 2007). Considerando questa prospettiva, la conclusione sarebbe che nell’uomo anche l’osservazione di una mano da sola è sufficiente ad attivare la corteccia premotoria. Questo aspetto è particolarmente importante considerando che quasi tutti gli studi sull’AOS e il sistema “mirror” nell’uomo sono stati condotti con stimoli che comprendevano solo una mano che agiva. Se, come è stato dimostrato nelle scimmie (Nelissen et al., 2005), l’utilizzo di uno stimolo che comprende solamente una mano non determinasse un’attivazione delle aree “mirror”, allora la letteratura che si riferisce ad attivazione mirror nell’uomo sarebbe da considerare errata. I miei risultati dimostrano, che nell’uomo, questo non è vero, confermando la validità di molti studi riguardanti l’AOS e il sistema mirror e contribuendo alla letteratura su questo campo con nuovi e importanti dati.


Referenze

Buccino, G., Binkofski, F., Fink, G.R., Fadiga, L., Fogassi, L., Gallese, V., et al., (2001). Action observation activates premotor and parietal areas in a somatotopic manner: an fMRI study. European Journal of Neuroscience, 13, 400–404.

Buccino, G., Solodkin, A., & Small, S. (2006). Functions of the mirror neuron system: implications for neurorehabilitation. Cognitive and behavioral neurology, 19, 55-63.

Dinstein, I., Hasson, U., Rubin, N., & Heeger, D.J. (2007). Brain areas selective for both observed and executed movements. Journal of Neurophysiology, 98, 1415–1427.

Dinstein, I., Gardner, J.L., Jazayeri, M., & Heeger, D.J. (2008). Executed and observed movements have different distributed representations in human aIPS. Journal of Neuroscience, 28, 11231–11239.

Ertelt, D., Small, S., Solodkin, A., Dettmers, C., McNamara, A., & Buccino, G. (2007). Action observation has a positive impact on rehabilitation of motor deficits after stroke. NeuroImage, 36, T164-173.
Evangeliou, M.N., Raos, V., Galletti, C., & Savaki, H.E. (2009). Functional imaging of the parietal cortex during action execution and observation. Cerebral Cortex, 19, 624–639.

Ferrari, P.F., Rozzi, S., & Fogassi, L. (2005). Mirror neurons responding to observation of actions made with tools in monkey ventral premotor cortex. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 17, 212-226.
Gazzola, V., Rizzolatti, G., Wicker, B., & Keysers, C. (2007). The anthropomorphic brain: The mirror neuron system responds to human and robotic actions. NeuroImage, 35, 1674-1684.

Gazzola, V., & Keysers, C. (2009). The observation and execution of actions share motor and somatosensory voxels in all tested subjects: single-subject analyses of unsmoothed fMRI data. Cerebral Cortex, 19, 1239-55.

Lui, F., Buccino, G., Duzzi, D., Benuzzi, F., Crisi, G., Baraldi, P., et al. (2008). Neural substrates for observing and imagining non-object-directed actions. Social Neuroscience, 3, 261-75.

Nakahara, K., Adachi, Y., Osada, T., & Miyashita, Y. (2007). Exploring the neural basis of cognition: multi-modal links between human fMRI and macaque neurophysiology. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 11, 84–92.

Nelissen, K., Luppino, G., Vanduffel, W., Rizzolatti, G., & Orban, G. A. (2005). Observing others: multiple action representation in the frontal lobe. Science, 310, 332-336.

Orban, G.A., Van Essen, D., & Vanduffel, W. (2004). Comparative mapping of higher visual areas in monkeys and humans. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 8, 315–324.

Raos, V., Evangeliou, M.N., & Savaki, H.E. (2007). Mental simulation of action in the service of action perception. Journal of Neuroscience, 27, 12675-12683.

Rizzolatti, G., Fogassi, L., & Gallese, V. (2001). Neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the understanding and imitation of action. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 2, 661–670.

Sereno, M.I. & Tootell, R.B. (2005). From monkeys to humans: what do we now know about brain homologies? Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 15, 135-144.

Wheaton, K.J., Thompson, J.C., Syngeniotis, A., Abbott, D.F., & Puce, A. (2004). Viewing the motion of human body parts activates different regions of premotor, temporal, and parietal cortex. NeuroImage, 22, 277-88.

Statistiche Download - Aggiungi a RefWorks
EPrint type:Ph.D. thesis
Tutor:Castiello, U
Ph.D. course:Ciclo 22 > Scuole per il 22simo ciclo > SCIENZE PSICOLOGICHE > PERCEZIONE E PSICOFISICA
Data di deposito della tesi:UNSPECIFIED
Anno di Pubblicazione:20 November 2009
Key Words:action observation
Settori scientifico-disciplinari MIUR:Area 11 - Scienze storiche, filosofiche, pedagogiche e psicologiche > M-PSI/01 Psicologia generale
Struttura di riferimento:Dipartimenti > Dipartimento di Psicologia Generale
Codice ID:2196
Depositato il:02 Dec 2010 15:38
Simple Metadata
Full Metadata
EndNote Format

Download statistics

Solo per lo Staff dell Archivio: Modifica questo record