Go to the content. | Move to the navigation | Go to the site search | Go to the menu | Contacts | Accessibility

| Create Account

Nascimbeni, Valerio (2012) New techniques to detect and characterize transiting exoplanets. [Ph.D. thesis]

Full text disponibile come:

[img]
Preview
PDF Document
27Mb

Abstract (english)

The study of extrasolar planets (in short, "exoplanets") is one of the most young and rapidly-evolving fields of astronomical research. The present thesis is primarily about the development of new observational and reduction/analysis techniques to 1) characterize known transiting extrasolar planets by means of high-precision, ground-based differential photometry 2) to exploit the same data to search for additional bodies in known planetary systems, by employing the so-called Transit Time Variation (TTV) analysis. For both aims, I developed independent and customized software pipelines targeted at minimizing or correcting every significant source of uncorrelated ("red") noise. Most of my thesis is focused on the design and implementation of the TASTE project (once known as "The Asiago Search for Timing time variations of Exoplanets"), a long-term and multi-site photometric campaign to follow up a selected sample of transiting exoplanets at small/medium-sized facilities. The contents of each chapter in summarized in what follows:

1) Introduction. In this chapter I will briefly discuss the present status of exoplanetary research, including an overview of the main techniques employed so far to detect and characterize exoplanets. Then I will discuss why and how we are looking for smaller and lighter planets around bright stars, and what techniques have been developed to work out the resulting instrumental issues. In particular, I will describe what the TTV technique is, its theoretical basis and how it can be applied to real measurements. I will also review the first results obtained with this method, both from ground-based facilities and from CoRoT and Kepler space missions.

2) The implementation of TASTE. In this chapter I will describe the design and implementation of the TASTE project, as originally conceived to be operated at one single facility (the 1.82m telescope at the Asiago Observatory). I will discuss the technical requirements, the criteria adopted for the selection of the target sample, the observing strategy, and the first version of the STARSKY pipeline, optimized to carry out differential photometry on defocused images. I will present the first two light curves of the "hot Jupiters" HAT-P-3b and HAT-P-14b gathered by TASTE, and demonstrate that they achieve the accuracy required to detect Earth-mass perturbers through TTVs, if locked on low-order orbital resonances such as 3:2 or 2:1. This chapter is based on: V. Nascimbeni, G. Piotto, L. R. Bedin, M.Damasso (2011): TASTE: The Asiago Search for Transit timing variations of Exoplanets. I. Overview and improved parameters for HAT-P-3b and HAT-P-14b, A&A, 527, A85.

3) A new observational study of HAT-P-13b. In this chapter I will present the first observational TTV study published by the TASTE collaboration. This work was prompted by a paper of Pal et al. (2011), who claimed the detection of a sizeable TTV in the transits of HAT-P-13b (an interesting hot Jupiter hosted by a multiplanetary system). I will show that TASTE data are in agreement with the Pal et al. (2011) measurements, supporting --along with other archival data-- the possible presence of a periodic TTV signal. I will point out how subsequent works (Southworth et al. 2012, Fulton et al. 2012) demonstrated that most past timing measurements were published with underestimated errors caused by neglected red noise, thus disproving the previously claimed TTV for this system. This chapter is based on: V. Nascimbeni, G. Piotto, L. R. Bedin, M. Damasso, L. Malavolta, L. Borsato (2011): TASTE II. A new observational study of transit time variations in HAT-P-13b, A&A, 532, A24.

4) A homogeneous study of WASP-3b. In this chapter I will present the first TASTE work based on observations made at IAC facilities, namely a new study of the hot Jupiter WASP-3b from six high-precision light curves secured at the IAC-80 telescope. I will describe the thorough (re-)analysis carried out on both archival and our data, employing homogeneous techniques and software tools, with the goal of deriving auto-consistent planetary parameters and timing measurements. I will show that our ensemble data set is not in agreement with the periodic TTV previously claimed by Maciejewski et al. (2010). Instead, I will demonstrate that the measured TTV scatter is indeed statistically significant, though it does not show any significant periodicity. Hence I will discuss the possible causes for that behavior, and present an updated ephemeris and improved orbital/physical parameters for this target. This chapter is based on: V. Nascimbeni, A. Cunial, S. Murabito, P. V. Sada, A. Aparicio, G. Piotto, L. R. Bedin, A. P. Milone, A. Rosenberg, L. Borsato, M. Damasso, V. Granata, and L. Malavolta (2012): TASTE III. A homogeneous study of transit time variations in WASP-3b, A&A, submitted.

5) Improved parameters for WASP-1b and HAT-P-20b. In this chapter I will analyze four high-precision light curves caught serendipitously at the Asiago 1.82m telescope (one of WASP-1b, three of HAT-P-20b). By also re-analyzing the most accurate archival data available, I will derive improved parameters and ephemeris for both targets, which do not show any significant TTV. I will discuss what upper limits can be set from this null detection to the mass of hypotetical perturbing planets. This chapter is based on: V. Granata, V. Nascimbeni, G. Piotto, L. R. Bedin, L. Borsato, M. Damasso, L. Malavolta (2012): TASTE IV. Refined ephemeris and parameters for WASP-1b and HAT-P-20b, A&A, in preparation.

6) A search for planets in NGC 6397. In this chapter I will describe a search for transiting planets and variable stars carried out in an outer field of the globular cluster NGC 6397 from space-based HST observations. The main sample is a set of ~2200 cluster-member M dwarfs belonging to the same stellar popolation. I will describe the algorithms I developed to correct systematic errors in a data set composed by 252 ultra-deep archival images from the ACS camera. As no transits were detected, I will discuss the significance of this null result. I will report twelve unpublished variables of various types, all of them discovered among field stars. This chapter is based on: V. Nascimbeni, L. R. Bedin, G. Piotto, F. De Marchi, R. M. Rich (2012): An HST search for planets in the lower Main Sequence of the globular cluster NGC 6397, A&A, 541, A144.

7) Field selection for PLATO} In the final chapter I will summarize my involvement in PLATO. Plato is a proposed ESA mission that will search primarily for low-mass, habitable planets around bright stars, covering up to the ~40% of the sky at the end of the mission. Suitable targets (dwarfs and subgiants later than spectral type F5, down to V~13) have to be selected in advance. An unprecedented all-sky stellar classification is then needed. Within the Working Package (WP 131210: "Analysis of photometric and astrometric catalogues") I evaluated the feasibility and reliability of stellar classification techniques based upon the existing and forthcoming photometric/astrometric catalogs.
[brace not closed]

Abstract (italian)

Lo studio dei pianeti extrasolari (o "esopianeti") è una branca della ricerca astronomica molto giovane e in rapidissima evoluzione. Il lavoro svolto nella presente tesi riguarda principalmente lo sviluppo di nuove tecniche di osservazione e di riduzione e analisi dati al fine di 1) caratterizzare pianeti extrasolari transitanti già noti attraverso fotometria differenziale di alta precisione, condotta da terra; e 2) fare uso degli stessi dati per cercare nuovi corpi in sistemi planetari già noti, sfruttando una tecnica di analisi nota come TTV (Transit Time Variation: variazione dei tempi di transito). Per entrambi gli scopi, ho sviluppato strumenti software indipendenti e mirati al fine di minimizzare o correggere ogni sorgente rilevante di errori sistematici (noto anche come "correlated noise" o "red noise"). Gran parte della mia tesi è focalizzata sulla progettazione e implementazione del progetto TASTE, una campagna osservativa multisito e a lungo termine per monitorare un campione selezionato di esopianeti con telescopi terrestri di classe piccola e media. Il contenuto di ciascun capitolo è riassunto in seguito.

1) Introduzione. In questo capitolo tratterò in breve la situazione attuale della ricerca sugli esopianeti, comprendente anche una panoramica sulle principali tecniche finora impiegate per rivelare e caratterizzare pianeti extrasolari. Quindi passerò a discutere perché e come la comunità scientifica si sta orientando verso la ricerca di pianeti sempre più piccoli e leggeri attorno a stelle brillanti, e illustrerò le tecniche sviluppate per aggirare i limiti attualmente imposti dagli strumenti. In particolare, descriverò in cosa consiste la tecnica TTV, quali sono i principi teorici sui quali si fonda e come questi possano essere applicati a misure reali. Passerò infine in rassegna i primi risultati ottenuti applicando questo metodo, sia da strumentazioni terrestri che dalle missioni spaziali Kepler e CoRoT.

2) Implementazione del progetto TASTE. In questo capitolo descriverò la progettazione e l'implementazione di TASTE nella configurazione originaria: ovvero, come un progetto concepito per un singolo telescopio (il riflettore Copernico da 1.82m presso l'Osservatorio Astrofisico di Asiago). Discuterò i requisiti tecnici imposti, i criteri adottati per la selezione del campione di oggetti, la strategia osservativa e la prima versione della pipeline software STARSKY, ottimizzata per eseguire fotometria differenziale di apertura su immagini appositamente sfuocate. Presenterò le prime curve di luce pubblicate da TASTE, dei pianeti cosiddetti "hot Jupiters" HAT-P-3b e HAT-P-14b, e dimostrerò che esse raggiungono l'accuratezza fotometrica necessaria per rilevare con la tecnica TTV pianeti perturbatori di massa terrestre, nel caso questi ultimi siano bloccati in una risonanza orbitale di basso ordine, come 3:2 o 2:1. Questo capitolo è basato sull'articolo: V. Nascimbeni, G. Piotto, L. R. Bedin, M. Damasso (2011): TASTE: The Asiago Search for Transit timing variations of Exoplanets. I. Overview and improved parameters for HAT-P-3b and HAT-P-14b, A&A, 527, A85.

3) Un nuovo studio osservativo di HAT-P-13b. In questo capitolo presenterò il primo studio TTV osservativo pubblicato dalla collaborazione TASTE. Questo lavoro è stato stimolato da un articolo di Pal et al. (2011) che rivendicava la scoperta di un considerevole segnale TTV nei transiti del pianeta HAT-P-13b (un caso interessante di "hot Jupiter" ospitato da un sistema planetario multiplo). Mostrerò che i dati raccolti da TASTE sono in accordo con le misure di Pal et al. (2011), il che conforta --assieme ad altri dati di archivio-- la possibile presenza di un segnale TTV periodico. Infine metterò in evidenza che lavori più recenti (Southworth et al. 2012, Fulton et al. 2012) hanno tentato di dimostrare che molte misure condotte in passato sono state pubblicate con errori di gran lunga sottostimati, a causa della presenza di red noise trascurato durante la fase di analisi di dati. Per questo motivo, oggi si ritiene probabile che la rivendicazione di Pal et al. (2011) sia spuria. Questo capitolo è basato sull'articolo: V. Nascimbeni, G. Piotto, L. R. Bedin, M. Damasso, L. Malavolta, L. Borsato (2011) TASTE II. A new observational study of transit time variations in HAT-P-13b, A&A, 532, A24.


4) Un'analisi omogenea del sistema WASP-3. In questo capitolo presenterò il primo lavoro del progetto TASTE basato su osservazioni condotte presso l'Observatorio del Teide dell'Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC): sei curve di luce ad alta precisione ottenute con il telescopio IAC-80. Descriverò l'analisi approfondita che è stata svolta sia su dati di archivio che sulle nostre misure, facendo uso di tecniche e software di riduzione/analisi omogenei. Lo scopo è di derivare parametri del pianeta e misure di tempo di transito in modo completamente autoconsistente. Illustrerò come l'insieme dei dati disponibili non sia in accordo con il presunto segnale TTV periodico rivendicato da Maciejewski et al. (2010). Al contrario, dimostrerò che la dispersione delle misure TTV è statisticamente significativa, sebbene priva di qualsiasi tipo di periodicità rivelabile. Passerò quindi a discutere le possibili cause di questo comportamento, presentando un'effemeride aggiornata per WASP-3b e ricavando per lo stesso parametri fisici e orbitali aggiornati. Questo capitolo è basato sull'articolo: V. Nascimbeni, A. Cunial, S. Murabito, P. V. Sada, A. Aparicio, G. Piotto, L. R. Bedin, A. P. Milone, A. Rosenberg, L. Borsato, M. Damasso, V. Granata, and L. Malavolta (2012) TASTE III. A homogeneous study of transit time variations in WASP-3b, A&A, submitted.

5) Parametri fisici e orbitali di WASP-1b e HAT-P-20b. In questo capitolo analizzerò quattro curve di luce di alta precisione ottenute serendipicamente con il telescopio da 1.82m di Asiago (un transito di WASP-1b e tre transiti completi di HAT-P-20b). Rianalizzando anche i più accurati dati di archivio attualmente disponibili, derivererò un'effemeride e dei parametri fisici e orbitali più precisi per entrambi i pianeti. Nessuno dei due mostra un segnale TTV significativo. Discuterò infine quali limiti superiori possono essere stimati riguardo alla massa di un ipotetico pianeta perturbatore in base a questa misura nulla. Questo capitolo è basato sull'articolo: V. Granata, V. Nascimbeni, G. Piotto, L. R. Bedin, L. Borsato, M. Damasso, L. Malavolta (2012) TASTE IV. Refined ephemeris and parameters for WASP-1b and HAT-P-20b, A&A, in preparation.

6) Una ricerca di pianeti in NGC 6397 In questo capitolo descriverò una ricerca di pianeti transitanti e stelle variabili condotta in un campo stellare periferico dell'ammasso globulare NGC 6397, sfruttando osservazioni di archivio del telescopio spaziale Hubble. Il campione principale è costituito da un insieme di ~2200 nane rosse appartenenti all'ammasso. Descriverò gli algoritmi che ho sviluppato per correggere gli errori fotometrici sistematici presenti in un insieme di 252 immagini ultraprofonde riprese con la camera ACS nel 2006. Poiché non sono stati rivelati transiti, discuterò la significatività di questo risultato nullo. Infine, descriverò e caratterizzerò dodici stelle variabili di diverse tipologie scoperte per la prima volta. Tutte queste variabili sono sorgenti di campo, non appartenenti all'ammasso. Questo capitolo è basato sull'articolo: V. Nascimbeni, L. R. Bedin, G. Piotto, F. De Marchi, R. M. Rich (2012) An HST search for planets in the lower Main Sequence of the globular cluster NGC 6397, A&A, 541, A144.

7) Selezione del campo di vista di PLATO Nell'ultimo capitolo passerò in rassegna il lavoro che mi ha visto coinvolto nello studio preparatorio per PLATO. PLATO è una missione spaziale proposta all'ESA che cercherà principalmente pianeti "abitabili" di piccola massa attorno a stelle brillanti, coprendo alla fine della missione un angolo sferico pari al ~40% dell'intero cielo. I target adatti comprendono stelle nane e subgiganti di tipo spettrale F5V e più freddi, più brillanti della magnitudine V~13. Tali target devono essere selezionati prima dell'inizio della missione vera e propria, pertanto è necessaria una classificazione stellare su tutto il cielo, e molto più profonda di quelle attualmente disponibili. All'interno del gruppo di lavoro WP 131210 ("Analysis of photometric and astrometric catalogues") ho investigato la fattibilità e l'affidabilità delle tecniche di classificazione stellare basate sui cataloghi fotometrici e astrometrici, sia quelli disponibili che quelli di prossima realizzazione.

Statistiche Download - Aggiungi a RefWorks
EPrint type:Ph.D. thesis
Tutor:Piotto, Giampaolo and Bedin, Luigi
Ph.D. course:Ciclo 24 > Scuole 24 > ASTRONOMIA
Data di deposito della tesi:30 July 2012
Anno di Pubblicazione:30 July 2012
Key Words:fotometria; stelle variabili; pianeti extrasolari; esopianeti; transiti
Settori scientifico-disciplinari MIUR:Area 02 - Scienze fisiche > FIS/05 Astronomia e astrofisica
Struttura di riferimento:Dipartimenti > Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia "Galileo Galilei"
Codice ID:5183
Depositato il:21 May 2013 09:13
Simple Metadata
Full Metadata
EndNote Format

Download statistics

Solo per lo Staff dell Archivio: Modifica questo record