Vai ai contenuti. | Spostati sulla navigazione | Spostati sulla ricerca | Vai al menu | Contatti | Accessibilità

| Crea un account

Ganau, Roberto (2015) Three Essays on Spatial Agglomeration and Firm Performance. [Tesi di dottorato]

Full text disponibile come:

[img]
Anteprima
Documento PDF
3016Kb

Abstract (inglese)

Does regional science matter nowadays? Several researchers have tried - and are still trying - to answer this question at the light of the fact that fast connections and communication technologies allow economic actors to easily interact and do business with global partners. Anyhow, the local and global dimensions seem to play a complementary role in influencing firms' economic performance and behaviour rather than being substitute factors. In fact, there are many cases of excellence among Italian industrial districts, high-tech clusters, and innovative milieus which suggest the relevance of the local dimension for firms to grow and compete.
The analysis of the local economic dimension dates back to the pioneering contribution of MARSHALL on the industrial district concept (Principles of Economics, 1890, Macmillan, London), which highlights the peculiar advantages for a firm from being located in an industrially specialised local system. According to MARSHALL's (1890) analysis, firms operating in a spatially bounded - and specialised - area can benefit from both tangible and intangible effects. Tangible effects are mainly related to the local availability of inputs' suppliers and specialised workers, the reduction of transportation costs, and the emerging of external-scale economies. On the contrary, intangible effects are related to the reduction of transaction costs (favoured by face-to-face and repeated interactions which increase trust, reputation, and reciprocity among the local actors), and the spread of knowledge and (tacit) information flows concerning production processes, technologies, and innovation practices.
Moving from these intuitions, economists started to analyse the role played by local forces in influencing the economic performance of regional systems and individual actors (i.e. firms). Attention has also been paid to local-based phenomena other than specialised agglomerated areas. Among these, the role of urban areas and the advantages related to the location in large and industrially diversified cities have been deeply analysed by geographers and regional economists.
In particular, agglomeration forces concerning - and arising from - the spatial concentration of the economic activity received great attention in both the theoretical and the empirical literature. The contribution of GLAESER, KALLAL, SCHEINKMAN and SHLEIFER ("Growth in Cities", Journal of Political Economy, 1992, Vol. 100, No. 6, pp. 1126-1152) represented the first attempt to empirically analyse the causal relationship between agglomeration externalities and local economic performance, and it began a wide cross-county literature on the topic.
This Thesis moves in this direction and tries to contribute to the debate concerning the relationship between spatial agglomeration forces and firms' economic performance. Specifically, it comes as a collection of three empirical papers dealing with this topic from very different perspectives.
The first chapter of the Thesis is entitled "Productivity, Credit Constraints and the Role of Short-Run Localization Economies: Micro-Evidence from Italy". This chapter is single-authored and is forthcoming in Regional Studies (doi:10.1080/00343404.2015.1064883). This paper investigates whether Italian manufacturing firms' productivity is affected by credit constraints, and whether short-run localisation economies foster productivity both directly and indirectly, moderating the negative effects of credit rationing via inter-firm credit relationships. The empirical exercise is based on a sample of 12,524 firms observed over the period 1999-2007 and drawn from the AIDA databank (Bureau Van Dijk), and it is carried out in three steps. First, Total Factor Productivity is estimated at the firm level through the approach proposed by WOOLDRIDGE ("On Estimating Firm-Level Production Functions Using Proxy Variables to Control for Unobservables", Economics Letters, 2009, Vol. 104, No. 3, pp. 112-114). Second, dynamic investment equations are estimated to investigate whether firms are credit constrained, and to test the potential moderation effect of short-run localisation economies on the investment-to-cash flow sensitivity. Third, an instrumental-variable approach is employed to test whether firms' productivity is negatively affected by credit constraints (i.e. the marginal effect of cash flow on investments), and whether short-run localisation economies positively affect productivity both directly and indirectly, downsizing the negative effects of credit rationing. The results suggest that firms are affected by credit rationing, and that localisation economies positively moderate the investment-to-cash flow sensitivity favouring inter-firm trade credit. It emerges a negative effect of credit rationing on firms' productivity, while localisation economies have both a direct and an indirect positive effect on productivity. In fact, short-run localisation economies seem to reduce the negative credit constraints-productivity relationship by about 4.5%. Finally, the results suggest a complementary effect between localisation economies and the local banking structure: the positive moderation effect of localisation economies on both firms' investment-to-cash flow sensitivity and the credit constraints-productivity relationship increases as the density of bank branches in the local system increases.
The second chapter is entitled "Industrial Clusters, Organised Crime and Productivity Growth in Italian SMEs" and is co-authored with Andrés Rodríguez-Pose (LSE). This paper empirically investigates whether organised crime (namely, mafia-type criminality) affects a firm's performance (defined in terms of Total Factor Productivity growth) both directly and indirectly, downsizing positive externalities arising from the geographic concentration of (intra- and inter-industry) market-related firms. Therefore, this paper investigates the simultaneous role played by - and the interplay of - market-based agglomeration economies and organised crime in influencing manufacturing small and medium sized firms' productivity growth. On the one hand, firms operating in a local system characterised by a high density of horizontally- and vertically-interconnected firms (in terms of input-output relationships) may benefit from both tangible (e.g. the reduction of transportation costs, the local availability of inputs' suppliers) and intangible (e.g. the reduction of transaction costs) agglomeration externalities which are likely to foster their productivity growth. On the other hand, organised crime is likely to negatively affect both the socio-economic environment and firms' performance, for instance imposing protection rackets, altering market rules and competition processes. In particular, criminal organisations may break established economic networks among firms, for instance imposing to local firms the acquisition of inputs from "illicit" firms controlled by the criminal organisation itself. The empirical analysis covers a large sample of Italian manufacturing small and medium sized firms observed over the period 2008-2011, and it employs a two-step sample-selection model to control for firm exit over the three-year growth period. The robustness of the results is tested controlling for potential endogeneity of the variables capturing industrial clustering and organised crime, as well as using two different approaches to estimate Total Factor Productivity. The results suggest a negative direct effect of organised crime on firms' productivity growth, while location in a dense local industrial system fosters productivity growth. Moreover, the positive effect of industrial clustering on productivity growth decreases as the level of organised crime increases in the local system, and that this negative moderation effect of organised crime is greater for smaller than for larger firms. Finally, the results suggest that the extortion crime has a very strong incidence in weakening a firm's performance.
The third chapter is entitled "Agglomeration, Heterogeneity and Firm Productivity" and is co-authored with Giulio Cainelli (University of Padova). This paper analyses the relationship between agglomeration (i.e. localisation- vs. diversification-type) economies and firms' short-run productivity growth using Italian manufacturing firm-level data. The analysis deals with two key issues. First, it deals with the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (MAUP) using distance-based agglomeration measures computed for each firm in the sample over a continuous space, thus avoiding the use of pre-defined spatial units of analysis. Second, it explicitly tests the hypothesis of firm heterogeneity in the context of agglomeration phenomena, i.e. it considers the firms located within a given geographic area as heterogeneous units which may contribute to the production of the agglomeration externalities in different ways, and with a different intensity, according to their specific characteristics (defined in terms of size and Total Factor Productivity). This means that firms can be seen both as receivers of the agglomeration externalities, and as producers of these externalities. The results suggest that intra-industry (i.e. localisation-type) externalities have a positive effect on firms' productivity growth at short distances, while a negligible effect at a longer distance (i.e. after 15 km). Moreover, this positive effect seems to decrease as the distance increases. On the contrary, inter-industry (i.e. diversification-type) externalities have a negative effect on firms' productivity growth at a very short distance (i.e. within 5 km), while a positive effect at a longer distance (i.e. after 15 km). Therefore, it emerges a sort of substitution effect between intra- and inter-industry externalities at different distances. It also emerges that firm heterogeneity (in terms of size and productivity) matters in the generation of intra-industry externalities: in fact, the decreasing-with-distance pattern characterising their positive effect changes to an increasing-with-distance pattern when neighbour firms' characteristics are accounted for. It follows an attenuation of the substitution effect between intra- and inter-industry externalities. In fact, they seem to have opposing effects at short distances (i.e. within 15 km), while both types of externalities seem to foster firms' productivity growth at a longer distance (i.e. after 15 km). Moreover, inter-industry externalities seem to have a greater effect on short-run productivity growth than intra-industry externalities.

Abstract (italiano)

Quanto contano gli studi regionali oggigiorno? Molti ricercatori hanno cercato - e ancora cercano - di rispondere a questa domanda alla luce dello sviluppo di mezzi e tecnologie di comunicazione che consentono agli attori economici di interagire e condurre affari con partner globali. Ad ogni modo, le dimensioni locale e globale sembrano avere ruoli complementari, anziché sostitutivi, nell'influenzare la performance e le scelte economiche delle imprese. Ciò emerge chiaramente se si considerano casi di successo tra i distretti industriali italiani, i cluster high-tech e i sistemi locali innovativi, che evidenziano la rilevanza della dimensione locale nel promuovere la crescita e la competitività delle imprese.
L'analisi della dimensione economica locale trova origine nello studio pioneristico di MARSHALL (Principles of Economics, 1890, Macmillan, London) sul concetto di distretto industriale, in cui sono messi in evidenza i vantaggi peculiari che un'impresa può trarre dall'essere localizzata in un sistema industriale locale altamente specializzato. Nello specifico, MARSHALL (1890) sottolinea come un'impresa che operi in una località geograficamente delimitata - e specializzata in termini di produzione industriale - possa trarre beneficio sia da fattori tangibili, sia da fattori intangibili. I primi riguardano la disponibilità "locale" di fornitori e lavoratori altamente specializzati, la riduzione dei costi di trasporto, e l'emergere di economie di scala esterne. I secondi, al contrario, riguardano la riduzione dei costi di transazione, che risulta facilitata da interazioni dirette e ripetute (tali da accrescere il livello di fiducia, reputazione e reciprocità) tra gli attori economici locali, e la diffusione di conoscenza e flussi di informazioni (tacite) riguardanti processi produttivi, tecnologie e pratiche innovative.
L'analisi di MARSHALL (1890) ha spinto molti economisti ad analizzare la relazione tra fattori legati alla dimensione locale e performance economica, sia a livello di sistemi regionali che di imprese. Nel tempo, diverse tipologie di "forze" locali sono state oggetto di studio, oltre ai conglomerati produttivi altamente specializzati. Ad esempio, economisti regionali e geografi hanno rivolto la loro attenzione verso la dimensione urbana e i vantaggi legati alla localizzazione in città caratterizzate da un'ampia diversificazione della struttura industriale.
In particolare, numerosi contributi teorici ed empirici hanno sottolineato la rilevanza di esternalità agglomerative legate alla concentrazione spaziale delle attività economiche. Il contributo di GLAESER, KALLAL, SCHEINKMAN and SHLEIFER ("Growth in Cities", Journal of Political Economy, 1992, Vol. 100, No. 6, pp. 1126-1152) è stato il primo tentativo di analizzare empiricamente la relazione di causalità tra esternalità agglomerative e performance economica locale, dando il via ad un'ampia letteratura sul tema.
Il presente elaborato (Tesi) si basa su questa letteratura, e cerca di contribuire al dibattito avente ad oggetto la relazione tra forze legate all'agglomerazione spaziale delle attività economiche e performance delle imprese. Nello specifico, questa Tesi è costituita da tre capitoli (papers) che analizzano la suddetta relazione da punti di vista molti differenti.
Il primo capitolo della Tesi è intitolato "Productivity, Credit Constraints and the Role of Short-Run Localization Economies: Micro-Evidence from Italy". Questo capitolo è a firma singola, ed è stato accettato per pubblicazione dalla rivista Regional Studies (doi:10.1080/00343404.2015.1064883). Questo capitolo analizza la relazione tra produttività di impresa, razionamento creditizio ed economie di localizzazione di breve termine. Nello specifico, analizza gli effetti diretti di razionamento creditizio ed economie di localizzazione sulla produttività di impresa, così come il potenziale effetto di moderazione (positivo) che le economie di localizzazione possono avere sulla relazione (negativa) tra razionamento creditizio e produttività, promuovendo fenomeni di "inter-firm trade credit". L'analisi empirica utilizza dati di fonte AIDA (Bureau Van Dijk) relativi ad un campione di 12.524 imprese osservate nel corso del periodo 1999-2007. L'analisi è condotto in tre fasi. In primo luogo, la Produttività Totale dei Fattore è stimata a livella di impresa utilizzando l'approccio proposto da WOOLDRIDGE ("On Estimating Firm-Level Production Functions Using Proxy Variables to Control for Unobservables", Economics Letters, 2009, Vol. 104, No. 3, pp. 112-114). Successivamente, una serie di funzioni di investimento dinamiche sono stimate al fine di analizzare se le imprese del campione siano oggetto di razionamento creditizio, e di testare il potenziale effetto di moderazione delle economie di localizzazione di breve termine sulla relazione tra investimenti e cash flow di impresa. Infine, sono stimati una serie di modelli per variabili strumentali al fine di analizzare se la produttività di impresa sia influenzata negativamente dal razionamento creditizio (definito come effetto marginale del cash flow sugli investimenti), e se le economie di localizzazione di breve termine abbiano sia un effetto positivo diretto sulla produttività, sia un effetto positivo indiretto tale da ridurre gli effetti negativi legati al razionamento creditizio. I risultati empirici suggeriscono che le imprese del campione siano oggetto di razionamento creditizio, e che le economie di localizzazione abbiano un effetto positivo tale da moderare la dipendenza degli investimenti dal cash flow favorendo fenomeni di "inter-firm trade credit". Emerge inoltre un effetto negativo del razionamento creditizio sulla produttività di impresa, mentre le economie di localizzazione sembrano avere un effetto diretto positivo sulla produttività. Allo stesso modo, le economie di localizzazione sembrano avere anche un effetto indiretto positivo sulla produttività: infatti, i risultati mostrano che l'effetto negativo del razionamento creditizio sulla produttività diminuisce del 4,5% quando l'effetto di moderazione delle economie di localizzazione è preso in considerazione. Infine, i risultati mostrano un effetto di complementarietà tra economie di localizzazione e struttura bancaria a livello locale. Infatti, l'effetto indiretto positivo delle economie di localizzazione risulta crescente al crescere della densità di filiali bancarie nel sistema locale di appartenenza dell'impresa.
Il secondo capitolo è intitolato "Industrial Clusters, Organised Crime and Productivity Growth in Italian SMEs", ed è co-autorato con Andrés Rodríguez-Pose (LSE). Questo secondo capitolo analizza il ruolo della criminalità organizzata (di tipo mafioso) sulla performance di impresa (definita in termini di crescita della Produttività Totale dei Fattori), considerando anche il suo potenziale effetto indiretto (negativo) sulla relazione (positiva) tra esternalità agglomerative legate alla co-localizzazione di imprese fornitrici (industrial clustering) e crescita della produttività di un campione di piccole e medie imprese manifatturiere italiane. Pertanto, sono presi in esame due differenti (e contrastanti) fattori definiti a livello locale: la criminalità organizzata e la concentrazione spaziale di imprese connesse da relazioni di mercato. Da una parte, imprese che operano in sistemi locali caratterizzati da un'alta densità di imprese potenzialmente connesse (orizzontalmente e verticalmente) da relazioni di mercato possono beneficiare di esternalità agglomerative sia tangibili (ad esempio, la riduzione dei costi di trasporto, la disponibilità di fornitori a livello locale) che intangibili (ad esempio, la riduzione dei costi di transazione), che tendono a favorire la crescita di impresa. Dall'altra parte, la presenza di organizzazioni criminali tende ad avere conseguenze negative sia per l'ambiente socio-economico, sia per la performance di impresa, ad esempio a causa dell'imposizione del pagamento del pizzo, di azioni lesive delle regole di mercato e dei processi competitivi tra imprese. In particolare, la criminalità organizzata opera nel mercato per mezzo di imprese "illegali" direttamente controllate, la cui presenza ed attività (ad esempio, l'imposizione dell'acquisto di input alle imprese "legali") tendono ad indebolire le relazioni di mercato esistenti tra le imprese locali. L'analisi empirica è basata su un campione di piccole e medie imprese manifatturiere italiane osservate nel periodo 2008-2011. L'analisi è condotta applicando modelli di tipo "sample selection", e la robustezza dei risultati è testata controllando per la potenziale endogeneità delle variabili che catturano i fenomeni di criminalità organizzata e agglomerazione industriale, così come stimando la Produttività Totale dei Fattori a livello di impresa per mezzo di due approcci econometrici differenti. I risultati mostrano un effetto diretto negativo della criminalità organizzata sulla crescita della produttività di impresa. AL contrario, la crescita della produttività trae beneficio da un'alta densità di imprese circostanti potenzialmente connesse da relazioni di mercato. I risultati suggeriscono inoltre un effetto negativo indiretto della criminalità organizzata, la cui presenza nel sistema locale sembra ridurre sensibilmente gli effetti positivi dell'agglomerazione di imprese sulla crescita della produttività. Questo risultato sembra particolarmente accentuato per le imprese di più piccole dimensioni. Inoltre, il crimine di estorsione sembra giocare un ruolo chiave in questo scenario.
Il terzo capitolo è intitolato "Agglomeration, Heterogeneity and Firm Productivity", ed è co-autorato con Giulio Cainelli (Università di Padova). Questo capitolo analizza la relazione tra economie di agglomerazione (nello specifico, economie di localizzazione e di diversificazione) e crescita della produttività di breve periodo utilizzando un campione di imprese manifatturiere italiane. Nello specifico, due aspetti chiave sono presi in considerazione. Il primo riguarda il cosiddetto "Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (MAUP)", che è trattato costruendo variabili di agglomerazione "distance-based" a livello di impresa e assumendo lo spazio come continuo, e cioè evitando l'uso di aree geografiche pre-definite come unità spaziali di analisi. Il secondo riguarda l'ipotesi di eterogeneità di impresa, che nel contesto dei fenomeni agglomerativi si riferisce all'idea che le imprese co-localizzate nello spazio siano unità eterogenee in grado di contribuire alla produzione delle esternalità agglomerative in maniera (e con intensità) differente in base alle loro specifiche caratteristiche (nello specifico, dimensione e Produttività Totale dei Fattori). Assumere eterogeneità di impresa implica assumere che le imprese non solo traggano beneficio dalle esternalità agglomerative, ma anche agiscano come loro "generatori". I risultati suggeriscono che le esternalità intra-industriali (economie di localizzazione) abbiano un effetto positivo sulla crescita della produttività nella breve distanza, mentre un effetto statisticamente non significativo per distanze maggiori (oltre i 15 km). Inoltre, questo effetto positivo risulta inversamente proporzionale rispetto alla distanza. Al contrario, le esternalità inter-industriali (economie di diversificazione) hanno un effetto negativo nella breve distanza (entro i 5 km), mentre un effetto positivo nella lunga distanza (oltre i 15 km). Pertanto, sembra emergere un effetto di sostituzione tra economie di localizzazione e di diversificazione a distanze differenti. I risultano mostrano inoltre l'importanza di considerare l'eterogeneità di impresa (in termini di dimensione e produttività) nel processo di generazione delle esternalità intra-industriali: infatti, quando si tiene conto delle caratteristiche specifiche delle imprese co-localizzate, emerge un effetto positivo delle economie di localizzazione che risulta crescente al crescere della distanza. Emerge quindi un'attenuazione dell'effetto di sostituzione tra esternalità intra- e inter-industriali, che sembrano avere effetti opposti nella breve distanza (entro i 15 km), mentre entrambe sembrano avere un effetto positivo sulla crescita della produttività nella lunga distanza (oltre i 15 km). Inoltre, le economie di diversificazione sembrano avere un effetto maggiore sulla crescita della produttività di breve termine rispetto alle economie di localizzazione.

Statistiche Download - Aggiungi a RefWorks
Tipo di EPrint:Tesi di dottorato
Relatore:Cainelli, Giulio
Dottorato (corsi e scuole):Ciclo 28 > Scuole 28 > SCUOLA SUPERIORE DI ECONOMIA E MANAGEMENT (INTERATENEO) > ECONOMIA E MANAGEMENT
Data di deposito della tesi:29 Ottobre 2015
Anno di Pubblicazione:2015
Parole chiave (italiano / inglese):Agglomerazione Spaziale; Produttività Totale dei Fattori; Firm-Level Analysis / Spatial Agglomeration; Total Factor Productivity; Analisi di Impresa
Settori scientifico-disciplinari MIUR:Area 13 - Scienze economiche e statistiche > SECS-P/02 Politica economica
Area 13 - Scienze economiche e statistiche > SECS-P/06 Economia applicata
Struttura di riferimento:Dipartimenti > Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Aziendali "Marco Fanno"
Codice ID:8991
Depositato il:07 Ott 2016 09:49
Simple Metadata
Full Metadata
EndNote Format

Download statistics

Solo per lo Staff dell Archivio: Modifica questo record